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How psychosocial stress profile influences the subsequent occurrence of neuropsychiatric comorbidities: A longitudinal population-based cohort study
Rao, Wen Wang1,2; Li, Muzi1,2; Su, Yingying1,2; Caron, Jean1,2; Xiang, Yu Tao3,4,5; Meng, Xiangfei1,2
2022-08-15
Source PublicationJournal of Affective Disorders
ISSN0165-0327
Volume311Pages:294-302
Abstract

Background: The role of psychosocial stressors in psychiatric disorders and executive dysfunction has been reported, separately. The literature has also suggested the involvement of social support and coping strategies in these relationships. However, there is a lack of research conducted to examine the relationships among multiple stressors and neuropsychiatric comorbidities while considering the presence of social support and coping strategies. This study aims to articulate the roles of multiple psychosocial stressors, social support, and coping strategies in the subsequent occurrence of neuropsychiatric comorbidities. Methods: Data analyzed were from the 6th data collection of a large-scale, longitudinal population-based cohort from Southwest Montreal in Canada. The cumulative effects of multiple stressors were separately examined by a composite score and latent profile analysis. Multinomial logistic regression models were used to test the relationship between cumulative stressors and neuropsychiatric comorbidities. Results: A total of 210 participants were included in the analyses. The LPA identified a 2-class model for psychosocial stressors (low and high) and executive function (executive dysfunction and no executive dysfunction), respectively. There were 11.8% of participants with neuropsychiatric comorbidities. Both the composite stress score (RR = 1.08, 95%CI = 1.01–1.15) and latent stress groups (RR = 3.65, 95%CI = 1.15–11.57) were associated with neuropsychiatric comorbidities after adjusting for social support and coping strategies. The risk of developing neuropsychiatric comorbidities decreased when the level of social support was high (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Exposures to multiple stressors increased the risk of subsequent neuropsychiatric comorbidities, but the risk can be modified by a higher level of social support.

KeywordCoping Strategies Cumulative Stress Neuropsychiatric Comorbidities Social Support
DOI10.1016/j.jad.2022.05.066
URLView the original
Indexed BySCIE ; SSCI
Language英語English
WOS Research AreaNeurosciences & Neurology ; Psychiatry
WOS SubjectClinical Neurology ; Psychiatry
WOS IDWOS:000812359100022
Scopus ID2-s2.0-85130538887
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Document TypeJournal article
CollectionFaculty of Health Sciences
Corresponding AuthorMeng, Xiangfei
Affiliation1.Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, McGill University, Montreal, Canada
2.Douglas Research Centre, Montreal, Canada
3.Unit of Psychiatry, Department of Public Health and Medicinal Administration, Institute of Translational Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Macau, Macao SAR, China
4.Centre for Cognitive and Brain Sciences, University of Macau, Macao SAR, China
5.Institute of Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Macau, Macao SAR, China
Recommended Citation
GB/T 7714
Rao, Wen Wang,Li, Muzi,Su, Yingying,et al. How psychosocial stress profile influences the subsequent occurrence of neuropsychiatric comorbidities: A longitudinal population-based cohort study[J]. Journal of Affective Disorders,2022,311:294-302.
APA Rao, Wen Wang,Li, Muzi,Su, Yingying,Caron, Jean,Xiang, Yu Tao,&Meng, Xiangfei.(2022).How psychosocial stress profile influences the subsequent occurrence of neuropsychiatric comorbidities: A longitudinal population-based cohort study.Journal of Affective Disorders,311,294-302.
MLA Rao, Wen Wang,et al."How psychosocial stress profile influences the subsequent occurrence of neuropsychiatric comorbidities: A longitudinal population-based cohort study".Journal of Affective Disorders 311(2022):294-302.
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