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The Congruency Sequence Effect Is Modulated by the Similarity of Conflicts
Yang, Guochun1,2; Xu, Honghui1,2; Li, Zhenghan1,2; Nan, Weizhi3; Wu, Haiyan4; Li, Qi5; Liu, Xun1,2
2021-10
Source PublicationJournal of Experimental Psychology: Learning Memory and Cognition
ABS Journal Level3
ISSN0278-7393
Volume47Issue:10Pages:1705-1719
Abstract

The congruence effect can be modulated by adjacent conflict conditions, producing the congruenc sequence effect (CSE). However, many boundary conditions prevent the transfer of the cross-conflict CSE. A consensus has been achieved that the CSE reflects both top-down control and bottom-up associative learning, but neither perspective could perfectly interpret the various boundary conditions. Their imperfections recently inspired an integrative learning account of cognitive control, which predicts that conflict similarity affects the magnitude of the cross-conflict CSE. We examined this hypothesis with the spatial Stroop-Simon paradigm by introducing a compound condition containing both the Stroopand Simon components (Experiment 1). The conflict similarity was defined by the degree of component overlap, as manipulated by the polar angle of the target arrow in Experiments 2a and 2b and by the Euclidean distance of the target arrow in Experiments 3a and 3b. Mixed-effect modeling analyses indicated that, in all experiments, the cross-conflict CSEs were positively correlated with the similarity among conflict conditions. Specifically, the compound condition with equal Stroop and Simon components generated comparable CSEs with both the Stroop and Simon conditions (Experiment 1). When the compound condition was more similar to the Stroop than the Simon condition, a trend of a larger CSE was observed between the compound conflict and the Stroop condition than between the compound conflict and the Simon condition, and vice versa (Experiments 2 and 3). Our study revealed that the continuum of the cross-conflict CSE was modulated by conflict similarity, hence supporting the integrative learning account of cognitive control

KeywordCognitive Control Congruency Sequence Effect Learning Similarity Transfer
DOI10.1037/xlm0001054
URLView the original
Indexed BySCIE ; SSCI
Language英語English
WOS Research AreaPsychology
WOS SubjectPsychology ; Psychology, Experimental
WOS IDWOS:000733040200001
Scopus ID2-s2.0-85119301553
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Cited Times [WOS]:1   [WOS Record]     [Related Records in WOS]
Document TypeJournal article
CollectionINSTITUTE OF COLLABORATIVE INNOVATION
Corresponding AuthorLiu, Xun
Affiliation1.CAS Key Laboratory of Behavioral Science, Institute of Psychology, Beijing, China
2.Department of Psychology, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, China
3.Department of Psychology and Center for Brain and Cognitive Sciences, School of Education, Guangzhou University, China
4.Centre for Cognitive and Brain Sciences and Department of Psychology, University of Macau, China
5.Beijing Key Laboratory of Learning and Cognition, Department of Psychology, Capital Normal University, China
Recommended Citation
GB/T 7714
Yang, Guochun,Xu, Honghui,Li, Zhenghan,et al. The Congruency Sequence Effect Is Modulated by the Similarity of Conflicts[J]. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning Memory and Cognition,2021,47(10):1705-1719.
APA Yang, Guochun,Xu, Honghui,Li, Zhenghan,Nan, Weizhi,Wu, Haiyan,Li, Qi,&Liu, Xun.(2021).The Congruency Sequence Effect Is Modulated by the Similarity of Conflicts.Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning Memory and Cognition,47(10),1705-1719.
MLA Yang, Guochun,et al."The Congruency Sequence Effect Is Modulated by the Similarity of Conflicts".Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning Memory and Cognition 47.10(2021):1705-1719.
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